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December 20 2013

'Mario Kart 8' Trailer Teases New Characters and Courses
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Nintendo continues to expand the presence of cosmos protector Rosalina, who debuted in 2007's Super Mario Galaxy. The company announced Thursday that Rosalina will be a playable character in two upcoming titles: Mario Kart 8 and Super Smash Bros.

The new trailer for Wii U's Mario Kart 8 shows off the entry of Rosalina and several baby characters into the racing game franchise. Viewers will also notice new courses (airport, desert and cloud scenarios) as well as fresh vehicles such as UFOs

Two additional trailers highlight Rosalina's inclusion in Wii U's forthcoming Super Smash Bros. (Wii U and Nintendo 3DS) and the recently released Super Mario 3D World: Read more...

More about Entertainment, Gaming, Nintendo, Mario Kart, and Wii U

October 24 2013

Super Mario Creator Is Obsessed With Fun and Accessibility
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Super Mario 3D World results from the evolution of a lot different Mario games, its creators say, and they hope it's the most fun and accessible title in the long series.

When fans first get their hands on this new Mario title, out Nov. 22 for Wii U, they'll notice it feels like the culmination of a lot of different ideas. You'll see the free-roaming movement from single-player games like Super Mario 64, and the chaotic multiplayer of recent titles like New Super Mario Bros.

"The 3D Mario games, up until Super Mario Galaxy, had really been a separate series for us, but after Galaxy we began to explore the relationship back to these 2D side-scrollers. In the case of Super Mario 3D World, we've figured out a way to evolve these elements," Shigeru Miyamoto, Mario's creator and producer of almost all his games, told Mashable. "Our goal right now is to expose as many people as possible to this type of gameplay in a 3D world." Read more...

More about Gaming, Nintendo, Super Mario Bros, Wii U, and Entertainment

September 09 2013

Is Nintendo Getting Pushed Out of the 12-and-Under Market?
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While the rest of Japan was still celebrating Tokyo’s 2020 Olympics victory, it was a grim day at the Kyoto headquarters of Nintendo. Investors had hoped the maker of video game consoles would win membership in Japan’s benchmark stock index, following the merger of the Osaka exchange — where Nintendo had been traded — with the larger Tokyo exchange. Nikkei Inc., keeper of the Nikkei 225, dashed those hopes Friday by announcing that Nintendo hadn’t made the cut. “This expectation has come to nothing,” wrote Takao Suzuki, an analyst at BNP Paribas. “This appears to be the right time to sell.”

Investors agreed. Within 90 minutes of Monday’s opening bell, Nintendo was down more than 7%. As the day wore on, things got worse. By the end of trading, Nintendo shares had lost 8.4% of their value. Read more...

More about Japan, Wii, Nintendo, Video Games, and Wii U

June 19 2013

5 Tech Trends That Will Change Gaming Forever
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This year's E3 showed off a myriad of new technology intended to enhance our gaming experiences. The impending release of two powerful next generation gaming consoles this holiday season means games are going to become more advanced.

These advancements will not only improve the quality of the games' looks onscreen, but also allow them to interact with the players unlike ever before. From motion controls to second-screen gaming, E3 offered a glimpse of the bright, innovative future to come in gaming.

Of all the technology on display, we've highlighted the five trends we expect to change gaming in the next few years or so. See something we missed? Share your thoughts in the comments below. Read more...

More about Gaming, E3, Ubisoft, Kinect, and Wii U

January 27 2012

Nintendo Announces Online Gaming Network

nintendo-network-600

Nintendo users will finally soon have an online experience on par with Xbox Live and PlayStation Network. At least that’s the message from Nintendo president Satoru Iwata, who broke the news in a meeting with investors yesterday shortly after the company released its quarterly earnings.

Iwata’s presentation explained that the Nintendo Network would encompass the company’s next generation of products, including the portable 3DS and the Wii U console, to be released later this year. The network won’t just be a place where users can play games against each other online — Iwata said it would also offer full downloads of game titles, some add-ons and access to other digital content. That would be a big upgrade from the limited network connectivity that currently exists on Nintendo’s hardware.

“Unlike Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, which has been focused upon specific functionalities and concepts,” Iwata said, “we are aiming to establish a platform where various services available through the network for our consumers shall be connected via Nintendo Network service so that the company can make comprehensive proposals to consumers.”

Iwata pointed out the new community functions in Mario Kart 7, which is already available, as the first example of the new network’s capabilities. He also said the next edition of the Final Fantasy franchise, due Feb. 16, would feature user-selectable music that would be available for paid download.

SEE ALSO: Free Demos Coming to Nintendo 3DS and Nintendo eShop

Selling games through the network is a little further out, though Iwata said the functionality is already built into the 3DS and would be part of the Wii U platform. Iwata was careful to hedge on when full games would actually be available, saying retail and distribution partners needed to be considered.

When the Wii U arrives, Iwata said it would feature a personal account system that’s tied to the Nintendo Network. That way it could have tailored settings and different content specifically for the user who logs in, something Iwata said has been a “challenge” with the Wii.

Besides the network, Iwata had another surprise about the Wii U: Near-field communication (NFC). The wireless tech, usually associated with mobile-payment systems like Google Wallet, will be built into the tablet controller for the console. Iwata said that with NFC “it will become possible to create cards and figurines that can electronically read and write data … to expand the new play format in the video game world.” He also mentioned micropayments as another potential function.

What do you think of the news about the Nintendo Network? Will it take the company’s gaming platform to a new level, or is it too little, too late? Sound off in the comments.


BONUS: Hands On With the Nintendo Wii U


Wii U Controller




This is the Wii U controller. It's 1.8-inches tall, 6.8-inches wide and 10.5-inches long. The screen is crisp and the controller is easier to hold than you might expect.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: Gaming, Nintendo, nintendo 3ds, Nintendo Network, video games, Wii U

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June 16 2011

Nintendo Says Wii U Won’t Play DVDs or Blu-ray Discs


Want to play DVDs or Blu-ray discs on your shiny new Nintendo Wii U when it’s available sometime next year? You’re out of luck. Like its predecessors, Nintendo went with a proprietary 25GB format that looks like it could accommodate Blu-ray discs and DVDs, but can’t.

Why did the company take away the convenience of being able to watch a movie on the same player used for playing games? Gaming site Kotaku quoted Nintendo president Satoru Iwata:

“The reason for that is we feel that enough people already have devices that are capable of playing DVDs and Blu-ray, such that it didn’t warrant the cost involved to build that functionality into the Wii U console because of the patents related to those technologies.”

Perhaps Nintendo wanted to keep the price down on the Wii U because of the relatively high cost of that shiny new controller.

Either way, you’ll probably be able to play DVDs and Blu-ray discs on the Wii U if you really want to, that is, if the hyperactive Wii hacking community of the past is any indication. Expect to find some kind of homebrew software that can solve that problem shortly after the Wii U hits the streets.


Hands-On: The Nintendo Wii U



Wii U Controller




This is the Wii U controller. It's 1.8-inches tall, 6.8-inches wide and 10.5-inches long. The screen is crisp and the controller is easier to hold than you might expect.


Wii U in HD




A Nintendo representative shows off the Wii U's HD graphics.


Wii U Shield Demo




A gamer is getting the tutorial on how to use the Wii U controller as a Shield


Wii U Battle Demo




In this game, the person with the Wii U controller flies a ship and tries to shoot players on the ground. The other players in the game control their characters with Wiimotes.


Wii U with Wii Controllers




A photo of me playing against a Nintendo representative in a space-themed battle game. I controlled a guy on the ground with the Wiimote and nunchuk while he flew a spaceship with the Wii U controller.


Wii U Console




This is the console. I didn't get to touch it, but it looks like a fatter Wii.


Nintendo Wii U Promo Pics



Wii U




Nintendo says it chose "U" for the name of its new device to emphasize the personal aspect of the new controller.


Wii U and Controller




The new controller is the most innovative aspect of Wii U, bringing a video screen/touch experience to the console.


Wii U Console




The console looks quite nondescript, gone are the more striking lines of the Wii.


Wii U Sans TV




Although the Wii U controller does require a console, you can play games without having to interface with the TV.


Wii U Controller




The new controller features a camera and a full control pad, in addition to the 6.2" screen.


Wii U Stylus




The Wii U is touch friendly but can also be interfaced with using a stylus, a la the Nintendo DS and the 3DS.


Wii U Controller in Action





Wii U Multiplayer Mode




When four players isn't enough, the Wii U can act as a controller/screen for a fifth friend.


Wii U Touch




The screen is touch sensitive.


Super Mario Bros. Mii




This is a screenshot from the Super Mario Bros. Mii game for Wii U.


Wii U Stylus in Action




If you think this looks like half of a DS, you're not alone. Nintendo is taking what it has used with its portable devices to make its home console even better.


Wii Remote Plus and Wii U





Wii U Portrait Mode




The Wii U Controller has an accelerometer and a gyroscope built in and it can be used in alternate orientations.


Wii U Web Control




The Wii U controller can be used to zoom in and navigate web content on your TV.


Wii U Controller Rear




This is how the controller looks from the rear.

More About: blu-ray, dvd, Gaming consoles, Nintendo Wii U, Wii U

For more Tech & Gadgets coverage:


June 12 2011

The Top 5 Nintendo Announcements at E3


Nintendo closed out E3 this year with a bang, thanks to the Wii U and a slew of new game announcements.

The unveiling of the Wii U was the show’s clear winner, stealing the thunder from Xbox Kinect and the PlayStation Vita. The console, designed to appeal to both casual and hardcore gamers, features 1080p graphics and a unique controller with a 6.2-inch touchscreen. The result is a two-screen gaming experience unlike anything on the market.

Nintendo’s new console wasn’t the company’s only announcement, though. The Legend of Zelda, Kid Icarus, Super Mario, Star Fox and a slew of other games got plenty of attention, as did Nintendo’s 3DS portable gaming system.

We’ve sifted through all of Nintendo’s announcements and boiled them down to our top five. Without further ado, here is what made headlines for Nintendo at E3:


Gallery: Nintendo’s Top Announcements


See below the gallery for the full list of announcements


1) Legend of Zelda Turns 25




One of Nintendo's most iconic franchises, The Legend of Zelda, turns 25 this year, and Nintendo has decided to celebrate with a bunch of new features and an orchestra.


More on Legend of Zelda




Yes, Nintendo actually hired an orchestra and a choir for its E3 press conference.


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A close-up shot of the choir, which sang several iconic Zelda melodies.


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Nintendo had the orchestra play while it showed a video tribute to 25 years of Legend of Zelda.


More on Legend of Zelda




Nintendo's first Zelda announcement was that it was going to have a Zelda symphony concert tour. The concert tour will come to the U.S., Europe and Japan sometime this Fall.


More on Legend of Zelda




The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is also available for download in the Nintendo eShop.


More on Legend of Zelda




Nintendo's Shigeru Miyamoto, creator of Legend of Zelda, takes the stage.


More on Legend of Zelda




Nintendo has also made Legend of Zelda: Four Swords available as a free download on the DSi.


The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening




Nintendo's newest Legend of Zelda Game, Skyward Sword, will be available this holiday season with a special-edition gold Wiimote.


2) The Nintendo eShot Drops on the 3DS




The online store for the 3DS, the Nintendo eStore, has finally made its debut. The store will contain classic Game Boy, NES and SNES games, as well as a few new surprises.


More on the Nintendo eStore




One of those surprises was a downloadable Pokédex with information on the new Pokémon in the Black and White games, as well as the ability to superimpose Pokémon into real-life photos.


More on the Nintendo eStore




A screenshot of the new Pokedex


3) Kid Icarus Returns




Kid Icarus made its debut in 1986, but little has been with the series until now. Kid Icarus: Uprising will be released for the 3DS this year and be the first game in the series since 1991.


More on Kid Icarus




Kid Icarus takes down the bad guys.


4) Star Fox, Mario & More




Nintendo's other iconic franchises are getting games as well. First up: Star Fox 64 3D, a revamped version of the Nintendo 64 game for the 3DS.


More on Nintendo's Upcoming Games




Do a barrel roll!


More on Nintendo's Upcoming Games




Luigi's Mansion 2 makes its debut on the 3DS this year.


More on Nintendo's Upcoming Games




Mario Kart 3D is on its way, as well.


More on Nintendo's Upcoming Games




You didn't think Nintendo would forget about Mario, would you? Super Mario 3D arrives at the end of 2011.


More on Nintendo's Upcoming Games




Super Mario 3D isn't a rehash of old Mario games though, but an infusion of side-scroller and 3D gameplay.


More on Nintendo's Upcoming Games




Classic Mario.


More on Nintendo's Upcoming Games




Animal Crossing is back!


5) The Nintendo Wii U




The big announcement though was the unveiling of the Nintendo Wii U and its 6.2-inch touchscreen controller.


More on the Nintendo Wii U




The controller creates a new form of interaction with the TV. In this photo, a user is sketching with the controller and seeing her work on the TV.


More on the Nintendo Wii U




The controller can even stream console games if someone wants to use the TV for something else.


More on the Nintendo Wii U




The Wii U controller compared to the Nintendo 3DS


More on the Nintendo Wii U




The Nintendo Wii U will feature 1080p HD graphics on-par with the PS3 or the Xbox 360.


More on the Nintendo Wii U




Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aime departs from the stage.


Highlights: Nintendo’s Top Announcements


1) Legend of Zelda Turns 25
2) The Nintendo eShot Drops on the 3DS
3) Kid Icarus Returns
4) Star Fox, Mario & More
5) The Wii U Revealed


Bonus: Hands-On With the Wii U



Wii U Controller




This is the Wii U controller. It's 1.8-inches tall, 6.8-inches wide and 10.5-inches long. The screen is crisp and the controller is easier to hold than you might expect.


Wii U in HD




A Nintendo representative shows off the Wii U's HD graphics.


Wii U Shield Demo




A gamer is getting the tutorial on how to use the Wii U controller as a Shield


Wii U Battle Demo




In this game, the person with the Wii U controller flies a ship and tries to shoot players on the ground. The other players in the game control their characters with Wiimotes.


Wii U with Wii Controllers




A photo of me playing against a Nintendo representative in a space-themed battle game. I controlled a guy on the ground with the Wiimote and nunchuk while he flew a spaceship with the Wii U controller.


Wii U Console




This is the console. I didn't get to touch it, but it looks like a fatter Wii.

More About: e3, gaming, Legend of Zelda, Mario, Nintendo, nintendo wii, Nintendo Wii U, super mario, Wii, Wii U, Zelda

For more Tech & Gadgets coverage:


June 11 2011

Exclusive: Who Won The E3 Buzz Battle? [INFOGRAPHIC]


Now that Nintendo, Sony and Microsoft have sung their spiels at the Electronic Entertainment Expo 2011 (E3), let’s find out which company, publisher and celeb got the most buzz during the week.

Webtrends compiled these figures measuring buzz on Twitter, blogs and other social media sources, gathered from Monday, June 6 through Friday, June 10 at 10 a.m. PST.

Who won the buzz battle? Was it Microsoft, which didn’t have any new hardware to show off but flaunted some highly anticipated games? Or maybe it was Sony grabbing the big buzz with its reveal of the PlayStation Vita. Or could it have been Nintendo with its groundbreaking Wii U?

Do you think the amount of buzz each gaming platform got during the week was equal to the importance (and quality) of the products they announced?

More About: e3, electronic entertainment Expo, gaming, infographic, microsoft, Nintendo, PlayStation Vita, sony, Wii U, Xbox 360

For more Tech & Gadgets coverage:


June 10 2011

Top 3 Gaming Trends From E3 2011

Technology expert Scott Steinberg is the CEO of high-tech consulting firm TechSavvy Global and a frequent tech analyst and gaming expert for ABC, CBS and CNN. He’s covered the field for more than 400 outlets from NPR to Rolling Stone, is the founder of GameExec Magazine and hosts the video series Game Theory, hailed as “the smartest take on the video game industry.”


Electronic Entertainment Expo, the annual video game convention better known as E3, isn’t just the top place to go to watch scantily-clad nymphs, armored stormtroopers and bespectacled businessmen awkwardly mingle. The industry-only event, which drew more than 46,800 rabid enthusiasts to the Los Angeles Convention Center this past week, also offers experts and everyday fans alike the clearest snapshot of where the future of gaming is headed.

This year’s event played host to the introduction of Nintendo’s new Wii U system (featuring 6.2-inch touchscreen controllers), Sony’s supercharged PlayStation Vita portable handheld and the arrival of YouTube and Bing on the Xbox 360. For better or worse, it also cemented what the coming years hold for gaming fans and pros — a roller coaster ride of unprecedented proportions.

Setting all the flashing lights, booming speakers and catchy ad libs by gaming execs aside, here are the event’s main attractions and the revelations they portend.


1. Traditional Gaming and Retail Aren’t Going Away


Despite all the hype surrounding the growth of mobile, social, online, digital, massively multiplayer and free-to-play games, blockbuster disc-based retail releases continue to enjoy a massive fan following. Garnering big interest from both the press and public, potential smashes in the making (and packaged goods) such as Battlefield 3, Mass Effect 3, Uncharted 3, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim and BioShock Infinite aren’t a dying breed. Rather, the focus at retail — a distribution channel which, while dwindling, isn’t going away overnight, and should enjoy a considerable presence for the coming decade — is switching to ultra-premium.

Translation: With review scores, competition and overall quality levels climbing, what we’re seeing is a shift to bigger, higher production value games with more expansive solo adventures or multiplayer components. In order to keep pace and justify the $60 price of entry, average and nondescript games are quickly falling by the wayside and being replaced by best-in-class hits. That’s generally good for all parties involved, especially players. It means better titles across the board, including those that begin — not end — at what’s in the box and offer more for your gaming dollar.


2. Motion Control Accessories Are Maturing


Both Sony with its PlayStation Move and Microsoft with the Kinect are doing everything in their power to illustrate why these accessories, thus far confined to largely casual and social applications, are worth the time of “hardcore” gamers. That means incorporating voice commands into Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Future Soldier so you can simply say “optimize for range” to instantly generate a custom weapon, or making it possible to cast spells with a wave of your hand in the fantasy role-player Fable: The Journey.

But more telling than actual gaming applications (e.g. playing air guitar or lopping off goblins’ heads with a simulated sword swipe) are the vistas these control methods open up for home entertainment. We’re as happy as the next geek that you can chat with aliens by reading off voice prompts in Mass Effect 3. But options to pull up Rebecca Black videos or search for new game demos just by saying “Bing Gears of War 3” feel very promising. It’s the kind of functionality that reaches far beyond standard gaming circles and into general interest digital media consumption.


3. Innovation Is Dead — Unless You Know Where to Look


Most game companies are currently pooping a joystick, as it’s nearly impossible to forecast future sales or predict how to make hits in an era where everything from play habits to the platforms and devices themselves are changing at a breakneck pace. Slow to adapt to the innovations of social, online and free-to-play games, most publishers are reacting the only way they know how: by doubling down on proven brands, franchises, sequels and spin-offs, or spending to acquire well-known Hollywood, TV and comic book licenses.

As such, two outcomes are inevitable. One: Expect to see more familiar franchises returning, receiving reboots or being resurrected in fresh forms year after year (hello Halo 4 and Tomb Raider). In the hopes of mitigating risk, everything old truly becomes new again. And two: Publishers will need to become leaner in more agile in the face of mounting and diverse competition. Staff will be cut, more versatile developers will be hired, and past business strategies will be shuttered as game houses struggle to turn around sinking battleships in the era of light watercraft. That’s not to say doom and gloom is in the air — rather, that insiders have been slow to adapt to innovations they’ve long known were coming, and there’s still some pain to go through before we fully reach the next level.


We’ll close with the biggest gaming trend of all — one that no one seems to want to talk about at a very blockbuster-focused conference like E3. As Internet connectivity continues to proliferate, bandwidth increases, mobile devices boom and the quality, sophistication and availability of on-demand gaming improves, the humble web browser — increasingly available on smartphones, tablets, PCs, TVs, consoles and other devices — may soon become the most popular, and ubiquitous, video game system of all.


More About: e3, gaming, kinect, microsoft, Nintendo, playstation, PlayStation Vita, sony, video games, Wii U

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Nintendo Wii U: First Impressions [PHOTOS]


Nintendo stole the show at E3 with the unveiling of its Nintendo Wii U console, but does it have enough to beat the competition and surpass its predecessor?

The Wii U is Nintendo’s attempt to create a console that will appease the casual and hardcore gaming crowds. Its selling point is a handheld controller with a 6.2-inch touchscreen. The controller’s second screen opens up a new realm of gaming possibilities, some of which Nintendo had on display at its booth on the E3 show floor.

I had a significant amount of time to try out the Nintendo Wii U, hold the controller, and play with Nintendo’s various demos. While I will have more to say about the console and its place in the gaming ecosystem, I wanted share my initial thoughts about the console and its unique controller.

Here are my first impressions of the Nintendo Wii U:

  • Key specs to remember: The Wii U controller has a 6.2-inch touchscreen, is 1.8-inches tall, 6.8-inches wide and 10.5-inches long. It supports up to 1080p HD video, has four USB connector slots, runs a IBM Power-based multi-core processor and is backwards compatible with the Wii.
  • The controller definitely feels big in your hands. It’s bigger and heavier than a handheld gaming system (including the PlayStation Vita), but once you start playing, you really forget about its size.
  • The controller’s touchscreen is gorgeous and responsive. It’s a full 6.2-inches, more than enough for clear viewing and gaming.
  • The controller uses circle pads rather than analog sticks. While this may be a sticking point with more traditional gamers, it didn’t really get in the way of gameplay. I thought I was going to hate the circle pads.
  • The first demo I tried was one where you block shots from pirates from multiple directions. It was a cool experience seeing the pirates shoot from the TV and then defending myself with the controller. The ability to place different content on the controller screen and the TV screen is a killer feature that could lead to some amazing gameplay.
  • The controller works in 360-degree environments. I found this out by using it to fly a spaceship during a battle with a few Nintendo people. It makes for a really intense gaming experience that goes a step beyond what the Nintendo 3DS and the PlayStation Vita offer.
  • The graphics, from a Legend of Zelda demo I saw, are definitely on-par with what you find on the PS3 or Xbox 360. I reserve judgment on this though until I see a Gears of War or Call of Duty game on the Wii U.
  • The Wii U can also use Wiimotes as controllers, and it makes for a fun experience when you can play the same game with completely different controllers and screens. Because it supports four Wiimotes and the Wii U controller, you can play five-player games. Nintendo wouldn’t tell me how many people a Wii U game will support in total.
  • The console itself simply looks like a fatter Wii. We don’t know how much memory it has or exactly how big it is. I’m sure Nintendo will slowly reveal details about the console as the launch approaches.

Conclusion: The Wii U is definitely a game-changer for the gaming industry. The controller system is crisp and opens up a world of possibilities. The graphics are powerful enough to appease hardcore gamers, who will definitely like the advanced gameplay mechanics the new touchscreen controller enables. It’s still early, but so far I’m impressed.

Check out the photos I snapped, as well as Nintendo’s official Wii U promo pics below. Let us know what you think of the Wii U in the comments.


Hands-On: The Nintendo Wii U



Wii U Controller




This is the Wii U controller. It's 1.8-inches tall, 6.8-inches wide and 10.5-inches long. The screen is crisp and the controller is easier to hold than you might expect.


Wii U in HD




A Nintendo representative shows off the Wii U's HD graphics.


Wii U Shield Demo




A gamer is getting the tutorial on how to use the Wii U controller as a Shield


Wii U Battle Demo




In this game, the person with the Wii U controller flies a ship and tries to shoot players on the ground. The other players in the game control their characters with Wiimotes.


Wii U with Wii Controllers




A photo of me playing against a Nintendo representative in a space-themed battle game. I controlled a guy on the ground with the Wiimote and nunchuk while he flew a spaceship with the Wii U controller.


Wii U Console




This is the console. I didn't get to touch it, but it looks like a fatter Wii.


Nintendo Wii U Promo Pics



Wii U




Nintendo says it chose "U" for the name of its new device to emphasize the personal aspect of the new controller.


Wii U and Controller




The new controller is the most innovative aspect of Wii U, bringing a video screen/touch experience to the console.


Wii U Console




The console looks quite nondescript, gone are the more striking lines of the Wii.


Wii U Sans TV




Although the Wii U controller does require a console, you can play games without having to interface with the TV.


Wii U Controller




The new controller features a camera and a full control pad, in addition to the 6.2" screen.


Wii U Stylus




The Wii U is touch friendly but can also be interfaced with using a stylus, a la the Nintendo DS and the 3DS.


Wii U Controller in Action





Wii U Multiplayer Mode




When four players isn't enough, the Wii U can act as a controller/screen for a fifth friend.


Wii U Touch




The screen is touch sensitive.


Super Mario Bros. Mii




This is a screenshot from the Super Mario Bros. Mii game for Wii U.


Wii U Stylus in Action




If you think this looks like half of a DS, you're not alone. Nintendo is taking what it has used with its portable devices to make its home console even better.


Wii Remote Plus and Wii U





Wii U Portrait Mode




The Wii U Controller has an accelerometer and a gyroscope built in and it can be used in alternate orientations.


Wii U Web Control




The Wii U controller can be used to zoom in and navigate web content on your TV.


Wii U Controller Rear




This is how the controller looks from the rear.

More About: e3, gaming, Nintendo, nintendo wii, Nintendo Wii U, Wii, Wii U

For more Tech & Gadgets coverage:


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